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Replicate Data to Kafka

This document describes how to create a changefeed that replicates incremental data to Apache Kafka using TiCDC.

Create a replication task

Create a replication task by running the following command:

cdc cli changefeed create \ --server=http://10.0.10.25:8300 \ --sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?protocol=canal-json&kafka-version=2.4.0&partition-num=6&max-message-bytes=67108864&replication-factor=1" \ --changefeed-id="simple-replication-task"
Create changefeed successfully! ID: simple-replication-task Info: {"sink-uri":"kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?protocol=canal-json&kafka-version=2.4.0&partition-num=6&max-message-bytes=67108864&replication-factor=1","opts":{},"create-time":"2023-11-28T22:04:08.103600025+08:00","start-ts":415241823337054209,"target-ts":0,"admin-job-type":0,"sort-engine":"unified","sort-dir":".","config":{"case-sensitive":false,"filter":{"rules":["*.*"],"ignore-txn-start-ts":null,"ddl-allow-list":null},"mounter":{"worker-num":16},"sink":{"dispatchers":null},"scheduler":{"type":"table-number","polling-time":-1}},"state":"normal","history":null,"error":null}
  • --server: The address of any TiCDC server in the TiCDC cluster.
  • --changefeed-id: The ID of the replication task. The format must match the ^[a-zA-Z0-9]+(\-[a-zA-Z0-9]+)*$ regular expression. If this ID is not specified, TiCDC automatically generates a UUID (the version 4 format) as the ID.
  • --sink-uri: The downstream address of the replication task. For details, see Configure sink URI with kafka.
  • --start-ts: Specifies the starting TSO of the changefeed. From this TSO, the TiCDC cluster starts pulling data. The default value is the current time.
  • --target-ts: Specifies the ending TSO of the changefeed. To this TSO, the TiCDC cluster stops pulling data. The default value is empty, which means that TiCDC does not automatically stop pulling data.
  • --config: Specifies the changefeed configuration file. For details, see TiCDC Changefeed Configuration Parameters.

Supported Kafka versions

The following table shows the minimum supported Kafka versions for each TiCDC version:

TiCDC versionMinimum supported Kafka version
TiCDC >= v8.1.02.1.0
v7.6.0 <= TiCDC < v8.1.02.4.0
v7.5.2 <= TiCDC < v8.0.02.1.0
v7.5.0 <= TiCDC < v7.5.22.4.0
v6.5.0 <= TiCDC < v7.5.02.1.0
v6.1.0 <= TiCDC < v6.5.02.0.0

Configure sink URI for Kafka

Sink URI is used to specify the connection information of the TiCDC target system. The format is as follows:

[scheme]://[userinfo@][host]:[port][/path]?[query_parameters]

Sample configuration:

--sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?protocol=canal-json&kafka-version=2.4.0&partition-num=6&max-message-bytes=67108864&replication-factor=1"

The following are descriptions of sink URI parameters and values that can be configured for Kafka:

Parameter/Parameter valueDescription
127.0.0.1The IP address of the downstream Kafka services.
9092The port for the downstream Kafka.
topic-nameVariable. The name of the Kafka topic.
kafka-versionThe version of the downstream Kafka. This value needs to be consistent with the actual version of the downstream Kafka.
kafka-client-idSpecifies the Kafka client ID of the replication task (optional. TiCDC_sarama_producer_replication ID by default).
partition-numThe number of the downstream Kafka partitions (optional. The value must be no greater than the actual number of partitions; otherwise, the replication task cannot be created successfully. 3 by default).
max-message-bytesThe maximum size of data that is sent to Kafka broker each time (optional, 10MB by default). From v5.0.6 and v4.0.6, the default value has changed from 64MB and 256MB to 10MB.
replication-factorThe number of Kafka message replicas that can be saved (optional, 1 by default). This value must be greater than or equal to the value of min.insync.replicas in Kafka.
required-acksA parameter used in the Produce request, which notifies the broker of the number of replica acknowledgements it needs to receive before responding. Value options are 0 (NoResponse: no response, only TCP ACK is provided), 1 (WaitForLocal: responds only after local commits are submitted successfully), and -1 (WaitForAll: responds after all replicated replicas are committed successfully. You can configure the minimum number of replicated replicas using the min.insync.replicas configuration item of the broker). (Optional, the default value is -1).
compressionThe compression algorithm used when sending messages (value options are none, lz4, gzip, snappy, and zstd; none by default). Note that the Snappy compressed file must be in the official Snappy format. Other variants of Snappy compression are not supported.
protocolThe protocol with which messages are output to Kafka. The value options are canal-json, open-protocol, avro and maxwell.
auto-create-topicDetermines whether TiCDC creates the topic automatically when the topic-name passed in does not exist in the Kafka cluster (optional, true by default).
enable-tidb-extensionOptional. false by default. When the output protocol is canal-json, if the value is true, TiCDC sends WATERMARK events and adds the TiDB extension field to Kafka messages. From v6.1.0, this parameter is also applicable to the avro protocol. If the value is true, TiCDC adds three TiDB extension fields to the Kafka message.
max-batch-sizeNew in v4.0.9. If the message protocol supports outputting multiple data changes to one Kafka message, this parameter specifies the maximum number of data changes in one Kafka message. It currently takes effect only when Kafka's protocol is open-protocol (optional, 16 by default).
enable-tlsWhether to use TLS to connect to the downstream Kafka instance (optional, false by default).
caThe path of the CA certificate file needed to connect to the downstream Kafka instance (optional).
certThe path of the certificate file needed to connect to the downstream Kafka instance (optional).
keyThe path of the certificate key file needed to connect to the downstream Kafka instance (optional).
insecure-skip-verifyWhether to skip certificate verification when connecting to the downstream Kafka instance (optional, false by default).
sasl-userThe identity (authcid) of SASL/PLAIN or SASL/SCRAM authentication needed to connect to the downstream Kafka instance (optional).
sasl-passwordThe password of SASL/PLAIN or SASL/SCRAM authentication needed to connect to the downstream Kafka instance (optional). If it contains special characters, they need to be URL encoded.
sasl-mechanismThe name of SASL authentication needed to connect to the downstream Kafka instance. The value can be plain, scram-sha-256, scram-sha-512, or gssapi.
sasl-gssapi-auth-typeThe gssapi authentication type. Values can be user or keytab (optional).
sasl-gssapi-keytab-pathThe gssapi keytab path (optional).
sasl-gssapi-kerberos-config-pathThe gssapi kerberos configuration path (optional).
sasl-gssapi-service-nameThe gssapi service name (optional).
sasl-gssapi-userThe user name of gssapi authentication (optional).
sasl-gssapi-passwordThe password of gssapi authentication (optional). If it contains special characters, they need to be URL encoded.
sasl-gssapi-realmThe gssapi realm name (optional).
sasl-gssapi-disable-pafxfastWhether to disable the gssapi PA-FX-FAST (optional).
dial-timeoutThe timeout in establishing a connection with the downstream Kafka. The default value is 10s.
read-timeoutThe timeout in getting a response returned by the downstream Kafka. The default value is 10s.
write-timeoutThe timeout in sending a request to the downstream Kafka. The default value is 10s.
avro-decimal-handling-modeOnly effective with the avro protocol. Determines how Avro handles the DECIMAL field. The value can be string or precise, indicating either mapping the DECIMAL field to a string or a precise floating number.
avro-bigint-unsigned-handling-modeOnly effective with the avro protocol. Determines how Avro handles the BIGINT UNSIGNED field. The value can be string or long, indicating either mapping the BIGINT UNSIGNED field to a 64-bit signed number or a string.

Best practices

  • It is recommended that you create your own Kafka Topic. At a minimum, you need to set the maximum amount of data of each message that the Topic can send to the Kafka broker, and the number of downstream Kafka partitions. When you create a changefeed, these two settings correspond to max-message-bytes and partition-num, respectively.
  • If you create a changefeed with a Topic that does not yet exist, TiCDC will try to create the Topic using the partition-num and replication-factor parameters. It is recommended that you specify these parameters explicitly.
  • In most cases, it is recommended to use the canal-json protocol.

TiCDC uses the authentication and authorization of Kafka

The following are examples when using Kafka SASL authentication:

  • SASL/PLAIN

    --sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?kafka-version=2.4.0&sasl-user=alice-user&sasl-password=alice-secret&sasl-mechanism=plain"
  • SASL/SCRAM

    SCRAM-SHA-256 and SCRAM-SHA-512 are similar to the PLAIN method. You just need to specify sasl-mechanism as the corresponding authentication method.

  • SASL/GSSAPI

    SASL/GSSAPI user authentication:

    --sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?kafka-version=2.4.0&sasl-mechanism=gssapi&sasl-gssapi-auth-type=user&sasl-gssapi-kerberos-config-path=/etc/krb5.conf&sasl-gssapi-service-name=kafka&sasl-gssapi-user=alice/for-kafka&sasl-gssapi-password=alice-secret&sasl-gssapi-realm=example.com"

    Values of sasl-gssapi-user and sasl-gssapi-realm are related to the principle specified in kerberos. For example, if the principle is set as alice/for-kafka@example.com, then sasl-gssapi-user and sasl-gssapi-realm are specified as alice/for-kafka and example.com respectively.

    SASL/GSSAPI keytab authentication:

    --sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?kafka-version=2.4.0&sasl-mechanism=gssapi&sasl-gssapi-auth-type=keytab&sasl-gssapi-kerberos-config-path=/etc/krb5.conf&sasl-gssapi-service-name=kafka&sasl-gssapi-user=alice/for-kafka&sasl-gssapi-keytab-path=/var/lib/secret/alice.key&sasl-gssapi-realm=example.com"

    For more information about SASL/GSSAPI authentication methods, see Configuring GSSAPI.

  • TLS/SSL encryption

    If the Kafka broker has TLS/SSL encryption enabled, you need to add the -enable-tls=true parameter to --sink-uri. If you want to use self-signed certificates, you also need to specify ca, cert and key in --sink-uri.

  • ACL authorization

    The minimum set of permissions required for TiCDC to function properly is as follows.

    • The Create, Write, and Describe permissions for the Topic resource type.
    • The DescribeConfigs permission for the Cluster resource type.

Integrate TiCDC with Kafka Connect (Confluent Platform)

To use the data connectors provided by Confluent to stream data to relational or non-relational databases, you need to use the avro protocol and provide a URL for Confluent Schema Registry in schema-registry.

Sample configuration:

--sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?&protocol=avro&replication-factor=3" --schema-registry="http://127.0.0.1:8081" --config changefeed_config.toml
[sink] dispatchers = [ {matcher = ['*.*'], topic = "tidb_{schema}_{table}"}, ]

For detailed integration guide, see Quick Start Guide on Integrating TiDB with Confluent Platform.

Integrate TiCDC with AWS Glue Schema Registry

Starting from v7.4.0, TiCDC supports using the AWS Glue Schema Registry as the Schema Registry when users choose the Avro protocol for data replication. The configuration example is as follows:

./cdc cli changefeed create --server=127.0.0.1:8300 --changefeed-id="kafka-glue-test" --sink-uri="kafka://127.0.0.1:9092/topic-name?&protocol=avro&replication-factor=3" --config changefeed_glue.toml
[sink] [sink.kafka-config.glue-schema-registry-config] region="us-west-1" registry-name="ticdc-test" access-key="xxxx" secret-access-key="xxxx" token="xxxx"

In the above configuration, region and registry-name are required fields, while access-key, secret-access-key, and token are optional fields. The best practice is to set the AWS credentials as environment variables or store them in the ~/.aws/credentials file instead of setting them in the changefeed configuration file.

For more information, refer to the official AWS SDK for Go V2 documentation.

Customize the rules for Topic and Partition dispatchers of Kafka Sink

Matcher rules

Take the following configuration of dispatchers as an example:

[sink] dispatchers = [ {matcher = ['test1.*', 'test2.*'], topic = "Topic expression 1", partition = "ts" }, {matcher = ['test3.*', 'test4.*'], topic = "Topic expression 2", partition = "index-value" }, {matcher = ['test1.*', 'test5.*'], topic = "Topic expression 3", partition = "table"}, {matcher = ['test6.*'], partition = "ts"} ]
  • For the tables that match the matcher rule, they are dispatched according to the policy specified by the corresponding topic expression. For example, the test3.aa table is dispatched according to "Topic expression 2"; the test5.aa table is dispatched according to "Topic expression 3".
  • For a table that matches multiple matcher rules, it is dispatched according to the first matching topic expression. For example, the test1.aa table is distributed according to "Topic expression 1".
  • For tables that do not match any matcher rule, the corresponding data change events are sent to the default topic specified in --sink-uri. For example, the test10.aa table is sent to the default topic.
  • For tables that match the matcher rule but do not specify a topic dispatcher, the corresponding data changes are sent to the default topic specified in --sink-uri. For example, the test6.aa table is sent to the default topic.

Topic dispatchers

You can use topic = "xxx" to specify a Topic dispatcher and use topic expressions to implement flexible topic dispatching policies. It is recommended that the total number of topics be less than 1000.

The format of the Topic expression is [prefix][{schema}][middle][{table}][suffix].

  • prefix: optional. Indicates the prefix of the Topic Name.
  • [{schema}]: optional. Used to match the schema name.
  • middle: optional. Indicates the delimiter between schema name and table name.
  • {table}: optional. Used to match the table name.
  • suffix: optional. Indicates the suffix of the Topic Name.

prefix, middle and suffix can only include the following characters: a-z, A-Z, 0-9, ., _ and -. {schema} and {table} are both lowercase. Placeholders such as {Schema} and {TABLE} are invalid.

Some examples:

  • matcher = ['test1.table1', 'test2.table2'], topic = "hello_{schema}_{table}"
    • The data change events corresponding to test1.table1 are sent to the topic named hello_test1_table1.
    • The data change events corresponding to test2.table2 are sent to the topic named hello_test2_table2.
  • matcher = ['test3.*', 'test4.*'], topic = "hello_{schema}_world"
    • The data change events corresponding to all tables in test3 are sent to the topic named hello_test3_world.
    • The data change events corresponding to all tables in test4 are sent to the topic named hello_test4_world.
  • matcher = ['test5.*, 'test6.*'], topic = "hard_code_topic_name"
    • The data change events corresponding to all tables in test5 and test6 are sent to the topic named hard_code_topic_name. You can specify the topic name directly.
  • matcher = ['*.*'], topic = "{schema}_{table}"
    • All tables listened by TiCDC are dispatched to separate topics according to the "schema_table" rule. For example, for the test.account table, TiCDC dispatches its data change log to a Topic named test_account.

Dispatch DDL events

Schema-level DDLs

DDLs that are not related to a specific table are called schema-level DDLs, such as create database and drop database. The events corresponding to schema-level DDLs are sent to the default topic specified in --sink-uri.

Table-level DDLs

DDLs that are related to a specific table are called table-level DDLs, such as alter table and create table. The events corresponding to table-level DDLs are sent to the corresponding topic according to dispatcher configurations.

For example, for a dispatcher like matcher = ['test.*'], topic = {schema}_{table}, DDL events are dispatched as follows:

  • If a single table is involved in the DDL event, the DDL event is sent to the corresponding topic as is. For example, for the DDL event drop table test.table1, the event is sent to the topic named test_table1.
  • If multiple tables are involved in the DDL event (rename table / drop table / drop view may involve multiple tables), the DDL event is split into multiple events and sent to the corresponding topics. For example, for the DDL event rename table test.table1 to test.table10, test.table2 to test.table20, the event rename table test.table1 to test.table10 is sent to the topic named test_table1 and the event rename table test.table2 to test.table20 is sent to the topic named test.table2.

Partition dispatchers

You can use partition = "xxx" to specify a partition dispatcher. It supports five dispatchers: default, index-value, columns, table, and ts. The dispatcher rules are as follows:

  • default: uses the table dispatcher rule by default. It calculates the partition number using the schema name and table name, ensuring data from a table is sent to the same partition. As a result, the data from a single table only exists in one partition and is guaranteed to be ordered. However, this dispatcher rule limits the send throughput, and the consumption speed cannot be improved by adding consumers.
  • index-value: calculates the partition number using either the primary key, a unique index, or an index explicitly specified by index, distributing table data across multiple partitions. The data from a single table is sent to multiple partitions, and the data in each partition is ordered. You can improve the consumption speed by adding consumers.
  • columns: calculates the partition number using the values of explicitly specified columns, distributing table data across multiple partitions. The data from a single table is sent to multiple partitions, and the data in each partition is ordered. You can improve the consumption speed by adding consumers.
  • table: calculates the partition number using the schema name and table name.
  • ts: calculates the partition number using the commitTs of the row change, distributing table data across multiple partitions. The data from a single table is sent to multiple partitions, and the data in each partition is ordered. You can improve the consumption speed by adding consumers. However, multiple changes of a data item might be sent to different partitions and the consumer progress of different consumers might be different, which might cause data inconsistency. Therefore, the consumer needs to sort the data from multiple partitions by commitTs before consuming.

Take the following configuration of dispatchers as an example:

[sink] dispatchers = [ {matcher = ['test.*'], partition = "index-value"}, {matcher = ['test1.*'], partition = "index-value", index = "index1"}, {matcher = ['test2.*'], partition = "columns", columns = ["id", "a"]}, {matcher = ['test3.*'], partition = "table"}, ]
  • Tables in the test database use the index-value dispatcher, which calculates the partition number using the value of the primary key or unique index. If a primary key exists, the primary key is used; otherwise, the shortest unique index is used.
  • Tables in the test1 table use the index-value dispatcher and calculate the partition number using values of all columns in the index named index1. If the specified index does not exist, an error is reported. Note that the index specified by index must be a unique index.
  • Tables in the test2 database use the columns dispatcher and calculate the partition number using the values of columns id and a. If any of the columns does not exist, an error is reported.
  • Tables in the test3 database use the table dispatcher.
  • Tables in the test4 database use the default dispatcher, that is the table dispatcher, as they do not match any of the preceding rules.

If a table matches multiple dispatcher rules, the first matching rule takes precedence.

Column selectors

The column selector feature supports selecting columns from events and sending only the data changes related to those columns to the downstream.

Take the following configuration of column-selectors as an example:

[sink] column-selectors = [ {matcher = ['test.t1'], columns = ['a', 'b']}, {matcher = ['test.*'], columns = ["*", "!b"]}, {matcher = ['test1.t1'], columns = ['column*', '!column1']}, {matcher = ['test3.t'], columns = ["column?", "!column1"]}, ]
  • For table test.t1, only columns a and b are sent.
  • For tables in the test database (excluding the t1 table), all columns except b are sent.
  • For table test1.t1, any column starting with column is sent, except for column1.
  • For table test3.t, any 7-character column starting with column is sent, except for column1.
  • For tables that do not match any rule, all columns are sent.

Scale out the load of a single large table to multiple TiCDC nodes

This feature splits the data replication range of a single large table into multiple ranges, according to the data volume and the number of modified rows per minute, and it makes the data volume and the number of modified rows replicated in each range approximately the same. This feature distributes these ranges to multiple TiCDC nodes for replication, so that multiple TiCDC nodes can replicate a large single table at the same time. This feature can solve the following two problems:

  • A single TiCDC node cannot replicate a large single table in time.
  • The resources (such as CPU and memory) consumed by TiCDC nodes are not evenly distributed.

Sample configuration:

[scheduler] # The default value is "false". You can set it to "true" to enable this feature. enable-table-across-nodes = true # When you enable this feature, it only takes effect for tables with the number of regions greater than the `region-threshold` value. region-threshold = 100000 # When you enable this feature, it takes effect for tables with the number of rows modified per minute greater than the `write-key-threshold` value. # Note: # * The default value of `write-key-threshold` is 0, which means that the feature does not split the table replication range according to the number of rows modified in a table by default. # * You can configure this parameter according to your cluster workload. For example, if it is configured as 30000, it means that the feature will split the replication range of a table when the number of modified rows per minute in the table exceeds 30000. # * When `region-threshold` and `write-key-threshold` are configured at the same time: # TiCDC will check whether the number of modified rows is greater than `write-key-threshold` first. # If not, next check whether the number of Regions is greater than `region-threshold`. write-key-threshold = 30000

You can query the number of Regions a table contains by the following SQL statement:

SELECT COUNT(*) FROM INFORMATION_SCHEMA.TIKV_REGION_STATUS WHERE DB_NAME="database1" AND TABLE_NAME="table1" AND IS_INDEX=0;

Handle messages that exceed the Kafka topic limit

Kafka topic sets a limit on the size of messages it can receive. This limit is controlled by the max.message.bytes parameter. If TiCDC Kafka sink sends data that exceeds this limit, the changefeed reports an error and cannot proceed to replicate data. To solve this problem, TiCDC adds a new configuration large-message-handle-option and provides the following solution.

Currently, this feature supports two encoding protocols: Canal-JSON and Open Protocol. When using the Canal-JSON protocol, you must specify enable-tidb-extension=true in sink-uri.

TiCDC data compression

Starting from v7.4.0, TiCDC Kafka sink supports compressing data immediately after encoding and comparing the compressed data size with the message size limit. This feature can effectively reduce the occurrence of messages exceeding the size limit.

An example configuration is as follows:

[sink.kafka-config.large-message-handle] # This configuration is introduced in v7.4.0. # "none" by default, which means that the compression feature is disabled. # Possible values are "none", "lz4", and "snappy". The default value is "none". large-message-handle-compression = "none"

This feature is different from the compression feature of the Kafka producer:

  • The compression algorithm specified in large-message-handle-compression compresses a single Kafka message. The compression is performed before comparing with the message size limit.
  • You can configure the compression algorithm in sink-uri. The compression is applied to the entire data sending request, which contains multiple Kafka messages. The compression is performed after comparing with the message size limit.

When large-message-handle-compression is enabled, the message received by the consumer is encoded using a specific compression protocol, and the consumer application needs to use the specified compression protocol to decode the data.

Send handle keys only

Starting from v7.3.0, TiCDC Kafka sink supports sending only the handle keys when the message size exceeds the limit. This can significantly reduce the message size and avoid changefeed errors and task failures caused by the message size exceeding the Kafka topic limit. Handle Key refers to the following:

  • If the table to be replicated has primary key, the primary key is the handle key.
  • If the table does not have primary key but has NOT NULL Unique Key, the NOT NULL Unique Key is the handle key.

The sample configuration is as follows:

[sink.kafka-config.large-message-handle] # large-message-handle-option is introduced in v7.3.0. # Defaults to "none". When the message size exceeds the limit, the changefeed fails. # When set to "handle-key-only", if the message size exceeds the limit, only the handle key is sent in the data field. If the message size still exceeds the limit, the changefeed fails. large-message-handle-option = "claim-check"

Consume messages with handle keys only

The message format with handle keys only is as follows:

{ "id": 0, "database": "test", "table": "tp_int", "pkNames": [ "id" ], "isDdl": false, "type": "INSERT", "es": 1639633141221, "ts": 1639633142960, "sql": "", "sqlType": { "id": 4 }, "mysqlType": { "id": "int" }, "data": [ { "id": "2" } ], "old": null, "_tidb": { // TiDB extension fields "commitTs": 163963314122145239, "onlyHandleKey": true } }

When a Kafka consumer receives a message, it first checks the onlyHandleKey field. If this field exists and is true, it means that the message only contains the handle key of the complete data. In this case, to get the complete data, you need to query the upstream TiDB and use tidb_snapshot to read historical data.

Send large messages to external storage

Starting from v7.4.0, TiCDC Kafka sink supports sending large messages to external storage when the message size exceeds the limit. Meanwhile, TiCDC sends a message to Kafka that contains the address of the large message in the external storage. This can avoid changefeed failures caused by the message size exceeding the Kafka topic limit.

An example configuration is as follows:

[sink.kafka-config.large-message-handle] # large-message-handle-option is introduced in v7.3.0. # Defaults to "none". When the message size exceeds the limit, the changefeed fails. # When set to "handle-key-only", if the message size exceeds the limit, only the handle key is sent in the data field. If the message size still exceeds the limit, the changefeed fails. # When set to "claim-check", if the message size exceeds the limit, the message is sent to external storage. large-message-handle-option = "claim-check" claim-check-storage-uri = "s3://claim-check-bucket"

When large-message-handle-option is set to "claim-check", claim-check-storage-uri must be set to a valid external storage address. Otherwise, creating the changefeed will fail.

TiCDC does not clean up messages on external storage services. Data consumers need to manage external storage services on their own.

Consume large messages from external storage

The Kafka consumer receives a message that contains the address of the large message in the external storage. The message format is as follows:

{ "id": 0, "database": "test", "table": "tp_int", "pkNames": [ "id" ], "isDdl": false, "type": "INSERT", "es": 1639633141221, "ts": 1639633142960, "sql": "", "sqlType": { "id": 4 }, "mysqlType": { "id": "int" }, "data": [ { "id": "2" } ], "old": null, "_tidb": { // TiDB extension fields "commitTs": 163963314122145239, "claimCheckLocation": "s3:/claim-check-bucket/${uuid}.json" } }

If the message contains the claimCheckLocation field, the Kafka consumer reads the large message data stored in JSON format according to the address provided by the field. The message format is as follows:

{ key: "xxx", value: "xxx", }

The key and value fields contain the encoded large message, which should have been sent to the corresponding field in the Kafka message. Consumers can parse the data in these two parts to restore the content of the large message.

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